Vertical splitting and combining
 
Vertical splitting relies on showing⁄hiding the top and bottom borders of adjacent cells. For further information on borders see Table and cell borders.
 
Let's start with a 4-cell table:
 
Cell 1 Cell 2
Cell 3 Cell 4
Figure 1
 
Think of each cell as having four borders, like this:
 
Cell 1   Cell 2
 
Cell 3   Cell 4
Figure 2
 
To avoid grid thickening, either the upper cell's floor or the lower cell's ceiling may be visible, but not both. (Occasionally you may notice a double thickness grid wall but this will disappear when you return to the article after moving to another node or closing the file, so is an artefact.)
 
Cell 1 floor visible Cell 2
Cell 3 ceiling hidden Cell 4
Figure 3
 
Cell 1 floor hidden Cell 2
Cell 3 ceiling visible Cell 4
Figure 4
 
Cell 1 floor hidden Cell 2
Cell 3 ceiling hidden Cell 4
Figure 5
 
Note the misalignment in the floors of Cells 1 and 2 in Figure 3 compared with Figure 4, due to different show⁄hide selections. If you notice this when creating your own tables, ensure that these parameters match across the whole row.
 
 
We have thus "combined" cells 1 and 3, so let's add some blank lines and rename the combination Cell 5:
 


Cell 5

Cell 2
 
Cell 4
 
Vertical splitting is essentially the reverse of this.
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