Tables hints and tips
 
Inserting images into tables
Tables are a good way to store images, which can be inserted using the Main menu ⁄ Insert ⁄ Image from file command. Just like HTML pages which owe their neatness to tables with hidden borders, you can hide the table borders once you have finished inserting images. If you wish to display the table frame (also referred to as a grid), you can space the image away from the cell wall by adding a blank line above (press Enter), or by adding spaces.
 
Many of the images you see in this manual are inside tables with hidden borders. You can verify this by making the Table toolbar visible, then clicking in the vicinity of an image to see if any of the left toolbuttons become activated.  All the tables in these articles are real tables, not images, as they stretch or shrink as the vertical separator between the article and tree panes is moved left or right.
 
Let's begin by creating a table with one row and two columns. Right-align the left cell and left-align the right cell. Paste the picture into the left cell and pad the text out with blank lines and spaces until it is approximately level with the middle of the image:
 
Blank line 1
Blank line 2
Blank line 3
     Figure 1
 
Finally, remove the window borders (click Hide borders toolbutton)and superfluous text so that the image appears pasted into the center of the article:
 



      Figure 2
 
 
Inserting images side by side
 
Fig. 2a Fig. 2b

When you insert an image, TreePad may add some blank lines underneath which prevent the cell from being as small as possible and thus require deletion. You should always do this before inserting the next side-by-side image is inserted, otherwise (blank lines being invisible) you may not be able to tell which image still has superfluous lines!
 
Creating an imitation grid using the Horizontal line
Here's a table with only two rows and four columns, which at first glance seems to contain seven rows. The extra rows were created by selecting Main menu ⁄ Insert ⁄ Horizontal line (Shift+Ctrl+L). Note that the line is confined to its cell. See Handy hint below.
 
  This is line 1

This is line 2

This is line 3

This is line 4

This is line 5
This is line 6


Who said you couldn't fit text alongside a table?

Figure 3a   Figure 3b Figure 3c
 
 
To complete the grid, insert the same number of horizontal lines into the cell on the right, as shown below. Now we have an image and a table sharing the same number of lines!
 
  This is line 1

This is line 2

This is line 3

This is line 4

This is line 5
This is line 6
...or even

make it

look

like

part of

a table!
Figure 4a   Figure 4b Figure 4c
 
 
 
Inserting a horizontal line into a table
This is slightly tricky. First type two lines of text with a blank space in between:
 
This is line 1
 
This is line 2
 
Now insert the horizontal line in the blank space and it will contract the whitespace as well:
 
This is line 1
This is line 2
 
(The horizontal line effect above was imitated using underscore, which you can use in its place, but the result is not as reliable.)
 
Do the same under line 2. Always make sure you insert a horizontal line above text or a blank line in a table as you may not be able to insert text below it.
 
Use tables to neaten hyperlinks
See Brighten up index hyperlinks for an example of using tables to neaten the appearance of hyperlinks by enclosing them.
 
Paragraph borders add fill color and style to a table
See Paragraph borders.
 
Select the entire table with one click
See Selecting rows and columns
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